Effective Rotator Cuff Injury Treatment

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Introduction

Shoulder injuries are fairly common, especially for people who tend to exercise a lot. Some of the most common shoulder injuries are called “rotator cuff” injuries.
This reference summary will help you better understand rotator cuff injuries, how to prevent them, and how they can be treated.

Anatomy

The shoulder joint joins the upper body to the arm.
The bones included in the shoulder joint are the following:
– the scapula, or shoulder blade bone
– the humerus, or upper arm bone

The shoulder bones are covered by tissue called cartilage. The smooth surfaces of the cartilage allow for smooth, painless movement in the shoulder joint. Ligaments connect the bones and help to keep the shoulder in place. Shoulder muscles that are attached to the shoulder blade are anchored in the head of the humerus. This allows the shoulder to move in all directions.
The combination of the muscles and ligaments in the shoulder is called the “rotator cuff.” The rotator cuff is located under part of the shoulder blade.
The “bursa” is a fluid-filled sac that is located between the shoulder joint and the rotator cuff. This prevents the rotator cuff from rubbing against the shoulder.

Symptoms & Causes

The symptoms of rotator cuff injuries include:
• shoulder pain, mostly when moving the shoulder or
sleeping on it
• tenderness in the shoulder
• weakness in the shoulder
• not being able to move the shoulder as much as normal

Symptoms of rotator cuff injuries may occur on their own, or they may be noticed after a fall or an injury.
Symptoms of rotator cuff injuries can also show up gradually, over a period of time. Strains or tears in the tendons or muscles that form the rotator cuff can be the cause of a rotator cuff injury.
Inflammation of the bursa, called bursitis, or inflammation of the tendons, called tendonitis, can also be part of a rotator cuff injury.
Sometimes the rotator cuff gets pinched between the shoulder joint and the overlying bone, causing pain and inflammation.
Rotator cuff injuries may occur due to:
• a fall or a specific trauma to the shoulder
• repetitive stress on the shoulder

Athletes and construction workers who use their shoulders a lot often have rotator cuff injuries, due to the physical nature of their activities. Factors that increase the risk of having a rotator cuff injury include:
• old age
• poor posture
• weak shoulder muscles

 

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